We may earn a fee if you buy via links in this post (at no extra cost to you). Learn more.

Misen Cookware In-Depth Review (With Pictures)

In this in-depth review, I break down the pros and cons of Misen cookware.

You’ll learn everything there is to know, including:

  • What it’s made of and how it’s made
  • How it looks and feels (with lots of pictures)
  • How it performs
  • What I like and dislike about it
  • And much more

So, if you’re shopping for new stainless steel or non-stick pots and pans and considering Misen, keep reading.

Note: If you’re only interested in carbon steel cookware, check out my in-depth review of Misen carbon steel.


Use the links below to navigate this review:


Misen Cookware Key Facts

Before I get into the details, let’s review some key facts about Misen cookware.

Options: Misen offers the following pots, pans, and cookware sets (check out all products on Misen.com):

  • 5-ply stainless steel skillet (8-inch, 10-inch, and 12-inch sizes)
  • 5-ply non-stick pan (8-inch, 10-inch, and 12-inch sizes)
  • Carbon steel pan (8-inch, 10-inch, and 12-inch sizes)
  • Starter Cookware Set
  • Essential Cookware Set
  • Complete Cookware Set
  • Stainless saute pan (3-qt.)
  • Stainless Rondeau (6-qt.)
  • Stainless stockpot (8-qt.)
  • Stainless saucier (2-qt. And 3-qt sizes)
  • Stainless roasting pan

In addition to cookware, Misen produces high-quality kitchen knives (check out my Misen Chef’s Knife review to learn more). 

Materials and Construction: Misen stainless steel and non-stick pans feature 5-ply construction with an 18/10 stainless steel exterior and interior and a triple-layer aluminum core for superior heat conduction.

The non-stick skillet is made with a thick aluminum base and a PFOA-free, 3-layer DuPont Platinum coating and plasma primer.

Misen carbon steel cookware has a 99:1 iron to carbon ratio, tall sides, and a large cooking surface. The ergonomic steel handles are secured with two rivets.

Where It’s Made: All Misen cookware is made in China, in a facility near Shanghai.

Oven-Safe: Misen stainless steel cookware is oven safe up to 500°F. The non-stick pans are oven safe up to 450°F. Carbon steel pans are oven safe up to 500°F with the silicone handles and up to 900°F without the silicone handles.

Dishwasher-Safe: The stainless steel and non-stick pots and pans are both dishwasher-safe. However, the carbon steel cookware must be washed by hand.

Induction-Compatible: All Misen cookware (stainless, non-stick, carbon steel) is compatible with induction cooktops.

Return Policy: Return any cookware item up to 60 days after the delivery date free of charge, no questions asked.

Where to Buy: Misen started as a direct-to-consumer cookware brand, only offering its products on Misen.com. However, they recently started selling its Chef’s knife and stainless steel skillet on Amazon.

Company Background: Omar Rada founded Misen in 2018 with a Kickstarter campaign for the Misen 8-Inch Chef’s Knife.

Since then, the company has expanded into cookware and kitchen accessories, frequently launching new products via Kickstarter (the Dutch oven campaign in the works).

Misen is gaining popularity, especially among millennials, by offering high-quality products at much lower prices than high-end brands like All-Clad, Le Creuset, and Wusthof.

Design

Misen cookware sports a classic and functional design. With clean lines and a sleek brushed stainless steel exterior, it’s well-suited for both modern and traditional kitchen styles.

But, instead of talking about the design, let me show you.

Misen 10 inch stainless steel skillet
Misen 10 inch stainless steel skillet (view on Misen.com or Amazon)

In this section, I give you an up-close look at the Misen 10-Inch Stainless Steel Skillet. The other stainless steel pots and pans have the same design features—you can check them out on Misen.com.

The non-stick and the carbon steel pans have some slight nuances that I’ll cover after the stainless steel cookware.

Handles

The stainless steel handles are round and comfortable. They are hollow to disperse heat and stay cool.

Misen 10 inch stainless steel skillet handle

The shiny, polished finish contrasts nicely with the brushed interior and exterior. The downside is that it shows fingerprints and smudges quite easily, but a quick wipe with a microfiber cloth will take care of that.

Misen 10 inch stainless steel skillet handle_2

The handles are secured to the skillet with two rivets with racetrack-shaped cutouts on each end for easy storage.

The handle’s base features a recessed Misen logo, which is aesthetically pleasing but can trap food and grease, making cleaning a bit more of a chore.

Misen logo engraved into the handle of the 10 inch stainless steel skillet

Interior

The 18/10 stainless steel cooking surface features a brushed, matte finish, which not only offers a modern look but helps conceal minor scratches.

Misen 10 inch stainless steel skillet cooking surface

The subtle graining produces a surface perfect for searing and browning. The sides are steeper than most pans, maximizing the cooking surface area.

The rims are rounded but not flared like most cookware, which keeps food securely in the skillet. But without flared rims, it’s more difficult to slide food to a plate or serving dish.

Exterior

The brushed stainless steel exterior is induction compatible. The Misen logo is etched onto the bottom of the pan.

Misen 10 inch stainless steel skillet brushed exterior

With a 3mm construction, the skillet is thick and sturdy. I like the solid feel, but some might find it a bit too heavy.

Lids

The lids have a simple and functional design with a brushed finish to match the cookware’s exterior.

Misen cookware lid design
Misen Stainless Steel Saucier (view on Misen.com)

They sit tightly on the base, locking in moisture and heat. The lid handle is wide, easy to grip, and has a polished finish, similar to the handles attached to the pots and pans.

Non-Stick Skillet

The Misen non-stick pan is made with a thick, commercial-grade aluminum base. At the bottom, they bond a stainless steel plate, making it compatible with all cooktops (including induction). The 3-layer PFOA-free non-stick coating is made from DuPont Platinum coating, known for superior release and durability.

Misen Non-Stick Pan
Misen Non-Stick Pan (view on Misen.com)

Additionally, the coating is infused with titanium, a plasma primer that is 2.5 times more effective than traditional primers for long-lasting results.

In short, the surface won’t easily scratch or flake. With proper use and care, you can extend the life of the non-stick coating. 

The non-stick also comes with a removable stay-cool, silicone handle grip textured for stability and comfort.

Carbon Steel Pan

The Misen carbon steel pan comes with a brushed stainless, ergonomic handle with double rivets and removable silicone grip. The tall pan sides prevent grease splatter.

Misen Carbon Steel Pan
Misen carbon steel pan (view on Misen.com)

The large cooking surface area allows you to add more food to your pan without crowding.

Carbon steel is the lightweight version of cast iron, making this pan the ultimate tool for high-heat cooking, searing, browning, and grilling.

I recently published an article where I cover the 17 pros and cons of carbon steel if you’re interested in learning more.

Stainless Steel Performance

I’ve spent several months testing the Misen stainless steel skillet; here’s how it performs.

The first thing you’ll notice when you pick up this pan is its heft. It’s not so heavy that you can’t manipulate it with one hand, but it’s noticeably heavier than other stainless steel pans.

The reason for its sturdy feel and heft is because the walls are 3.0 mm thick, making Misen stainless steel cookware one of the thickest on the market. By contrast, comparable Made In pans are 2.7 mm thick, and All-Clad pans are 2.6 mm.

That thickness helps the cookware absorb more heat, resulting in an even, consistent temperature across the entire cooking surface and walls.

Misen pans have 5-ply construction, meaning that five separate layers of metal are bonded together to make the pan. In this case, the exterior and interior are stainless steel with a three-layer aluminum core in the middle.

The aluminum core transfers and distributes heat while the steel makes for an ideal cooking surface and exterior because it’s ultra-durable and won’t react with acidic ingredients.

When I compared heating performance against Made In’s stainless steel pan, Misen heated faster. Both pans heated evenly as evidenced by the air bubble patterns, but Made In boasted better heat retention.

Made In versus Misen Cookware Heat Test
Made In versus Misen Cookware Heat Test

Overall, both performed well, and I have no complaints regarding Misen’s performance (view the full results of my Misen vs. Made In comparison).

One thing that surprised me while using the Misen skillet was how easy it is to clean. Food sticks to most stainless steel pans unless you’re really careful, but so far, I haven’t had any issues. Even delicate foods like eggs slide around freely, as long as you add enough grease.

My only minor criticism is that it might be too heavy for some people, but it’s nowhere near as heavy as a cast iron skillet.

Non-Stick Performance

In the promotional video for the Misen non-stick pan, Misen’s founder, Omar Rada, shows off the cookware’s food release properties by blowing an egg around. 

Naturally, that was the first thing I tried when I got the pan, and it worked; the air glides right under the egg with zero sticking whatsoever. 

The Misen non-stick pan truly is non-stick. I’ve been cooking with it for several months, and food has never stuck to the surface, not even a tiny bit. 

Ingredients slide around with ease, and a quick rinse and wipe are all it takes to clean the pan. 

Non-stick cookware, in general, is not ideal for searing and browning. However, I gave it a shot with the Misen pan and was impressed with the results. 

Take a look at the crust I was able to get on this piece of salmon. 

Seared salmon on the Misen non-stick pan

I’m not usually a fan of silicone-wrapped handles, but it’s one of my favorite aspects of the Misen non-stick pan. The silicone wrapper is soft and provides excellent grip. In addition, it’s secure yet easy to slip off if you need to put the pan in the oven. 

Misen non-stick pan handle with the silicone wrapper

It’s not all positive with the Misen non-stick pan. There are a few downsides to note. 

First, the shiny bottom looks sleek right out of the box, but it quickly accumulates brown spots and discoloration that’s nearly impossible to clean due to the small circular cutouts in the steel plate. 

Here’s the before picture:

Bottom of Misen non-stick pan
Bottom of Misen non-stick pan

And here’s the after:

Discoloration on the bottom of the Misen non-stick pan

Second, it’s pretty awkward to maneuver without the silicone wrapper on the handle. The handle is flat and thin, unlike the rounded handle on Misen stainless steel cookware. 

Misen non-stick pan handle without the silicone wrapper

When you take the silicone wrapper off, it’s difficult not to tip the pan in one direction or the other. This isn’t a huge deal since you’ll likely only use the pan without the silicone wrapper when you’re cooking in the oven. 

Lastly, in less than a year, the non-stick coating is starting to show signs of wear with surface-level scratches. I haven’t noticed any decline in performance yet, but the cooking surface doesn’t look as fresh as it did initially. 

Scratches on the cooking surface of the Misen non-stick pan

Overall, I’m very impressed with the Misen on-stick pan. It does exactly what it’s supposed to do: makes cooking simple and easy. 

The handle is comfortable, the surface is slick, and it sears fish and meats as good as most stainless steel cookware. I would expect to pay at least $100 for this type of performance, but Misen offers it for only $55 (10-inch version).

Downsides

There’s a lot to love about Misen cookware, but there are a few downsides, too. In this section, I cover the disadvantages, so you have the full picture.

Unproven brand: Misen is still new to the market. It will take a few years to really see how the cookware holds up.

No warranty: Most cookware brands offer some warranty, but Misen has chosen not to at this time. However, they offer a 60-day, no-questions-asked return policy.

Limited options: Unlike brands like All-Clad and Calphalon, Misen only offers one version of their cookware. If you get overwhelmed with choices, this is a good thing. But if you want more options to compare, you won’t find it (at least not yet).

Made In China: If you prefer American-made cookware, you’ll need to look at other brands (check out this review of the best cookware made in the USA). While Misen claims to have very high standards, they don’t share much information about their manufacturing process.

Polished handles show smudges: This may get annoying. You’ll have to wipe them regularly to keep them looking pristine. 

Non-stick coating scratches: Non-stick cookware won’t last forever, and the Misen pan is no exception. Unfortunately, I noticed scratches on the non-sick coating after only a few months. While minor scratches won’t impact performance, you need to be careful when cooking with metal utensils.

Oven-Safe temperature: Misen stainless cookware is oven safe up to 500°F. By contrast, All-Clad stainless is oven safe up to 600°F, and Made In stainless is oven-safe to 800°F.

No flared rims: Without flared rims, it makes flipping food and sliding it to the plate a bit more difficult.

Only available online: Although selling on its website and Amazon allows Misen to keep prices low, you can’t go to the store and get your hands on the cookware before buying it.

Price

One of the best things about Misen cookware is the affordable price. It’s not the cheapest cookware, but it’s certainly not the most expensive.

For the quality materials and thick, 5-ply construction, it’s an excellent value.

Misen can offer such low prices because it sells online on Misen.com and Amazon, cutting out the middlemen and retail markups. Also, manufacturing the cookware in China keeps costs down.

The chart below shows the current prices of all cookware items:

ProductPriceView Details
Stainless steel skillet (8-inch)$55Misen.com
Stainless steel skillet (10-inch)$65Misen.com
Stainless steel skillet (12-inch)$75Misen.com
Stainless saute pan (3-qt.)$95Misen.com
Stainless Rondeau (6-qt.)$105Misen.com
Stainless stockpot (8-qt.)$105Misen.com
Stainless saucier (2-qt.)$75Misen.com
Stainless saucier (3-qt.)$85Misen.com
Stainless roasting pan$125Misen.com
Non-stick pan (8-inch)$45Misen.com
Non-stick pan (10-inch)$55Misen.com
Non-stick pan (12-inch)$65Misen.com
Carbon steel pan (8-inch)$55Misen.com
Carbon steel pan (10-inch)$65Misen.com
Carbon steel pan (12-inch)$85Misen.com
Starter Cookware Set$225Misen.com
Essential Cookware Set$325Misen.com
Complete Cookware Set$425Misen.com

Bottom Line: Should You Buy Misen Cookware?

Misen cookware is beloved by its customers, and it’s easy to see why.

The design is sleek and modern, the performance is in lockstep with high-end brands like All-Clad, and the price is right.

But, even with its growing accolades, no cookware brand is right for everyone.

So, the question is: should you buy Misen cookware?

Here is my recommendation:

You should buy Misen cookware if:

  • You’re ready to elevate your cookware collection at home but not ready to spend thousands to do so.
  • You’re looking for cost-effective cookware that features 5-ply construction with a simple yet elegant design comparable to long-established, high-end brands.
  • You want cookware that heats quickly and evenly and has excellent heat retention.
  • You crave versatile cookware that can be used on any cooktop, including induction.
  • You like the idea of cookware that can transition from cooktop to oven to tabletop.
  • You want a choice of high-quality stainless steel, non-stick, or carbon steel pans.
  • You prefer brushed stainless steel over polished.
  • You like the idea of being able to try it for 60 days with a no-hassle return policy.
  • You’re ready for next-level cooking and understand how to cook with and care for stainless steel and carbon steel.

If this sounds like you, check out more details on Misen.com and Amazon. There, you can read reviews, learn more about each product, and view current prices.

You should NOT buy Misen cookware if:

  • You prefer a brand that has been around for decades and has a long track record of durability and success.
  • You want a brand that is endorsed by famous chefs.
  • You prefer cookware made in the United States or cookware NOT made in China.
  • You want lightweight cookware.
  • Money is no object, and you want a top of the line brand with lots of options.
  • You prefer to hold a product before purchasing (Misen is only available online).
  • You want a brand that offers a warranty.

If this sounds like you, you may want to consider other cost-effective options, such as Made In, or take a look at more expensive brands like All-Clad or Demeyere.

Overall, I recommend Misen cookware. It’s well-built, performs great, looks fantastic, and is very affordable. If you’d like to compare a similar brand, check out my take on Made In vs. Misen.

Let us know your thoughts on Misen cookware!

Have you tried Misen cookware? If yes, let us know what you think about it in the comments below.

Andrew Palermo Founder of Prudent Reviews

Andrew Palermo - About the Author

Andrew is the Founder and Editor-in-Chief of Prudent Reviews. He’s been studying consumer buying behavior for over a decade and has managed marketing campaigns for over a dozen Fortune 500 brands. When he’s not testing the latest home products, he’s spending time with his family, cooking, and doing house projects. Connect with Andrew on LinkedIn or via email.

Leave a Comment


As an Amazon Associate, Prudent Reviews earns fees when you click on links within our articles and make qualifying purchases.

All content on PrudentReviews.com is intended for informational purposes only. The information provided on this website is not intended to be a replacement or substitute for professional advice.