Is All-Clad Cookware Oven-Safe? (Quick Guide)

Is All-Clad Cookware Oven-Safe

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All-Clad cookware is second to none in terms of performance and durability.

But, since premium cookware brands like All-Clad come with a hefty price tag, most shoppers want to know all the details before they invest in a new set.

If you’re in the market for a new set of cookware or you’re trying out a new recipe with pans you already own, you might be wondering:

Can All-Clad cookware go in the oven?

If it can, what is the maximum oven-safe temperature?

Surprisingly, the answer isn’t easy to find on All-Clad.com and several websites that sell All-Clad cookware have conflicting information.

To get the truth, I went right to the source and contacted All-Clad via their customer service line (1-800-255-2523).

Here’s what they told me.

All-Clad stainless steel cookware is completely safe in the oven and under the broiler up to 600 degrees Fahrenheit (315 degrees Celsius). Their non-stick cookware is safe in the oven up to 500 degrees Fahrenheit (260 degrees Celsius) but you should only use it under the broiler for a limited amount of time (a minute or two).

They also emphasized that for both their stainless steel and non-stick cookware, the lids are NOT oven-safe.

The All-Clad product specialist explained that their lids are not designed to withstand the heat of the oven. She warned that, if you put them in the oven, the stainless steel lids will warp and the glass lids that come with their non-stick cookware could explode into pieces.

Bottom line—All-Clad cookware is oven-safe but the lids are not.

Navigate this article:

Oven-Safe Temperature for Every All-Clad Cookware Line

Here’s a quick chart that shows the oven-safe temperature for each All-Clad cookware line.

Note: I included links to Amazon and other sites that sell All-Clad so you can see pictures and learn more about each cookware line. In some cases, these sites list the wrong maximum oven-safe temperature. 

Cookware LinesMax Oven-Safe Temperature (Fahrenheit) Max Oven-Safe Temperature (Celsius) TypeLearn More
All-Clad D5600315Stainless steelSee on Amazon
All-Clad LTD600315Stainless steelSee on Amazon
All-Clad C4 Copper600315Stainless steelSee on Amazon
All-Clad Copper Core600315Stainless steelSee on Amazon
All-Clad D3 Stainless600315Stainless steelSee on Amazon
All-Clad D3 Compact600315Stainless steelSee on Amazon
All-Clad D3 Armor600315Stainless steelSee on Amazon
All-Clad MC²600315Stainless steelSee on Amazon
All-Clad TK600315Stainless steelSee at Williams Sonoma
All-Clad HA1 Hard-Anodized500260Non-stickSee on Amazon
All-Clad B1 Hard Anodized500260Non-stickSee at All-Clad.com
All-Clad Essentials500260Non-stickSee on Amazon

Documentation on All-Clad.com

If you’re looking for further validation, there are two places on All-Clad.com where you can find information about the oven compatibility of their cookware.

However, both places are not easy to find and the information they provide is vague and somewhat incomplete.

Regardless, here’s where you can find it.

Product Listings

The first place to find out whether a particular piece or set of cookware is oven-safe is within its product listing page.

Go to All-Clad.com and click on “All Products” and then “Cookware”.

All-Clad.com - All Products - Cookware
All-Clad.com > All Products > Cookware

Find the piece or set that you want more information on and click on it.

Once you’re on the product listing page, you have to scroll down to the “Essentials” section and click the left/right arrows until you find a call-out box like the one below.

All-Clad Product Listing - Oven Safe Temperature
All-Clad Product Listing – Oven-Safe Temperature

I have a couple of issues with this.

First, within product listing pages for non-stick cookware, it calls out that it’s oven and broiler safe, but doesn’t mention anything about only using it under the broiler for a minute or two.

When I called All-Clad, the product specialist made it clear to me that their non-stick cookware is not safe under the broiler for extended periods.

Secondly, on mobile, the “Essentials” section doesn’t exist. Instead, you’ll see a “Specifications” section that calls out “Oven compatibility: Yes” but doesn’t specify the maximum temperature—not helpful.

All-Clad Product Listing Specifications - Oven Safe
All-Clad “Specifications” section

In both the “Essentials” and “Specifications” sections, there’s no mention that the lids are not oven-safe.

User Manual

The other place you can find information about the oven-safety of All-Clad cookware is in their user manual.

Each product listing has a link to the user manual in the “Documentation” section.

Their user manual says stainless steel cookware is “Oven and broiler safe” and non-stick cookware is “Oven safe up to 500°f. Do not use under the broiler.”

All-Clad User Manual - Oven Safe Temperature
All-Clad User Manual

I have several issues with this.

  • It doesn’t specify the maximum oven-safe temperature for stainless steel cookware
  • It says to not use non-stick cookware under the broiler (Reminder: The All-Clad rep I spoke to said you can put their non-stick cookware under the broiler for a minute or two).
  • It doesn’t say anywhere to remove the lids (a specific safety instruction the All-Clad rep told me).

Is All-Clad Non-Stick Cookware Really Oven-Safe?

There are a lot of rumors swirling about the safety, or lack thereof, of non-stick cookware.

Many people believe that the non-stick coating is toxic and overheating it, especially in the oven, could produce dangerous fumes.

But, as I mentioned, All-Clad non-stick cookware including their HA1, B1, and Essentials lines is completely safe in the oven up to 500 degrees Fahrenheit or 260 degrees Celsius.

So, are non-stick pans safe in the oven like All-Clad claims or not?

I went into great detail on the safety of non-stick cookware in a recent comparison of Teflon vs. Ceramic cookware, so I won’t bore you with all the details, but here’s what you need to know.

In the past, the chemical PFOA was used in the processing of PTFE (a.k.a. Teflon) which is the material All-Clad and many other cookware brands use to create their non-stick coating.

There are valid concerns from reputable organizations, including the American Cancer Society, about the safety of PFOA. Due to these concerns, all U.S manufacturers (including All-Clad) have stopped using PFOA in the processing of their materials.

Today, the only concern with non-stick cookware is overheating. When overheated, the coating on non-stick pans, including All-Clad’s, can produce fumes that may result in temporary flu-like symptoms.

However, over the past 40 years, a period in which billions of pans were sold, there have been only a few reported accounts of issues

So, yes, All-Clad non-stick cookware really is over-safe. But, the concerns regarding overheating are why the maximum oven-safe temperature of their non-stick cookware is lower than their stainless steel cookware and it’s why you shouldn’t use it under the broiler for more than a couple minutes.

Precautions When Cooking with All-Clad in the Oven

Before you get started on that new recipe and pop your All-Clad pan in the oven, there are a handful of things you should be aware of to stay safe and avoid damaging your cookware.

Hot Handles

All-Clad’s cast stainless steel handles are designed specifically to stay cool while cooking on the stove.

However, their handles will get piping hot in the oven or under the broiler.

Use potholders or a towel when removing All-Clad pans from the oven.

When you take a hot pan out of the oven turn the handle towards the wall and place a towel or potholder on the handle as a reminder to you and others to not touch.

All-Clad hot handles

Lids Are NOT Oven-Safe

I know I covered this already but I want to reiterate that All-Clad lids, including both their stainless steel and glass ones, are not safe to put in the oven.

Some cookware brands make oven-safe lids but All-Clad isn’t one of them.

If you’re making a dish that benefits from the moisture retention of a sealed lid, such as pulled pork, use a cast-iron Dutch oven that comes with an oven-safe lid and is specifically designed to withstand the heat of the oven for long periods.

My favorite piece of cookware for these types of recipes is the Le Creuset 5.5 quart round Dutch oven, it’s available on Amazon).

Le Creuset 5.5 quart Dutch oven on dining room table
Le Creuset 5.5 quart Dutch oven (see on Amazon)

Heat Tint

Overheating All-Clad cookware in the oven is not only a safety concern but can also lead to a splotchy rainbow blue stain.

Cookware heat tint

This discoloration is referred to as “heat tint”.

According to The Cookware Advisor, when you overheat a stainless steel pan, trace amounts of chromium in the steel form a thick oxidized layer that reflects light at a different wavelength, causing heat tint.

These stains are annoying and unsightly but, fortunately, you can remove them by scrubbing the pan with Bar Keepers Friend (see on Amazon) or a mix of water and white vinegar.

A better option—keep your oven below the allowable temperatures when you’re cooking with All-Clad.

Warping

All-Clad cookware is thick, durable, and made with multiple layers of bonded steel and aluminum or copper.

The chances of All-Clad cookware warping are slim, however, it’s possible if you’re not careful.

As I described in a recent article, the root cause of warping is rapid changes in temperature. When a pan goes from room temperature to a scorching hot oven or if you rinse a hot pan under cold water, the pan can expand or contract unevenly and become warped.

The takeaway—whether your cooking on the stove or in the oven, heat up and cool down your pans gradually and don’t exceed the over-safe temperature.

Handling

All-Clad cookware is thicker and heavier than most brands, so use two hands (with potholders of course) when transferring it to and from the oven.

It might be tempting to pull the pan out of the oven with one hand, but the weight of the pan with food in it and the hot slippery handle makes for a dangerous situation.

Most All-Clad pots and large pans have a second “helper handle” which makes it easy to handle with two hands.

All-Clad helper handle
All-Clad helper handle

Final Thoughts

Some of the most delicious recipes call for searing on the stove followed by roasting in the oven (like these pork chops).

pork chops

All-Clad cookware is perfect for those recipes because it conducts heat fast and evenly on the stove and is safe in the oven up to 600 degrees (500 for non-stick).

Several other brands, like Calphalon and Cuisinart, make oven-safe pots and pans too, but you have to read the fine print.

Some of their pieces have silicone wrapped handles or special non-stick coatings that are not compatible in the oven.

My advice—if it’s not clear whether a set is oven-safe or not, don’t take the risk. Sometimes even the information on Amazon isn’t accurate (it says All-Clad stainless steel cookware is only oven-Safe up to 500 degrees, which is wrong).

Instead of relying on 3rd parties, call the manufacturer directly. To make it even easier, here are the customer service numbers for the top brands.

All-Clad: 1-800-255-2523

Cuisinart: 1-800-726-0190

Calphalon: 1-800-809-7267

Zwilling J.A. Henckels: 1-800-777-4308

Tramontina: 1-800-221-7809

T-fal: 1-800-395-8325

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