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HexClad vs. Henckels HXagon: Which Hybrid Pans Are Better?

What’s the difference between HexClad and Henckels HXagaon pans? Why are HexClad pans more than double the price?

Is it because they spend more on advertising and pay celebrity chef Gordon Ramsay to promote them, or are HexClad pans actually better?

In this comparison of HexClad vs. Henckels HXagon, you’ll see how these brands perform side-by-side.

You’ll learn how they differ in food release, searing, heat conduction, heat retention, and efficiency on induction cooktops. I also reveal the key differences in their design and construction.

So, if you’re thinking about buying hybrid cookware but aren’t sure if you should splurge on HexClad or save money and buy Henckels HXagon, keep reading.


Use the links below to navigate the comparison:


HexClad vs. Henckels HXagon: Key Takeaways

If you only have a minute, here’s a quick summary of the key differences between HexClad and Henckels HXagon cookware. Throughout the full comparison, I provide a much more detailed analysis and share photos I captured during testing.

If you don’t feel like reading, watch me test these two brands head-to-head in the video below:

Cooking Performance: I tested HexClad vs. Henckels HXagon side by side, cooking several foods. Both pans heated evenly but the Henckels HXagon pan heated faster, while HexClad retained heat better. You can cook eggs and pancakes in less time with Henckels, but HexClad sears chicken, burgers, and other meats more evenly. Skip ahead to see the full test results, including side-by-side pictures.

Heat Conduction Test: Using an electric cooktop, Henckels boiled two cups of water in two minutes and 19 seconds. HexClad boiled the water in two minutes and 30 seconds.

Heat Retention Test: After the water boiled, I removed both pans from the heat. After ten minutes, the water in the HexClad pan was 102°F, and the water in the Henckels HXagon pan was 96°F.

Induction Cooktop Test: I poured two cups of cold water into both pans, placed them on induction burners, and set both burners to 248°F simultaneously. Water in the HexClad pan boiled first, which indicates HexClad is more efficient on induction cooktops.

Handle Design: Both brands have rounded handles, but Henckels’ handle is a half inch longer (8.5 inches vs. 8 inches), angled higher, and has a small groove on top to rest your thumb.

Cooking Surface: Both brands have a hybrid cooking surface with raised stainless steel peaks and non-stick valleys, but Henckels pans have a higher ratio of steel to non-stick coating. Despite this, I didn’t notice a difference in stickiness when cooking eggs.

Henckels HXagon and HexClad pans
Henckels HXagon and HexClad pans

Bottom: HexClad extends its non-stick and stainless steel pattern to the pan’s bottom, making cleaning easier. However, the rough steel hexagons may scratch glass cooktops (this happened to a Prudent Reviews reader). The exterior of Henckels HXagon pans is polished steel without any non-stick coating or hexagon pattern.

Price: HexClad cookware costs more than twice as much as Henckels HXagon.

Should You Buy HexClad or Henckels HXagon Pans?

Based on my testing, Henckels HXagon pans perform similarly to HexClad but cost a fraction of the price. So, if you’re looking for the best value, Henckels is the clear winner. However, HexClad has some advantages — it’s thicker, retains heat better, heats faster on induction, and has proven to perform well over several years. The Henckels HXagon collection was released in 2024, so we don’t know how durable it is in the long term.

Compare prices and read more reviews on HexClad.com and Costco.com (Henckels).

Cooking Tests

Let’s get straight to the point — HexClad costs more than Henckels HXagon, but does it perform better?

First, I conducted an egg test. I preheated 12-inch HexClad and Henckels HXagon pans on low for a couple of minutes, then added an egg to each pan without greasing the cooking surfaces.

You can cook eggs in most traditional non-stick pans with little to no oil or butter, but unfortunately, that’s not the case with HexClad or Henckels HXagon. The eggs stuck to both pans and fell apart when I tried to move them.

Eggs sticking to ungreased Henckels HXagon and HexClad pans
Eggs sticking to ungreased Henckels HXagon (left) and HexClad pans (right)

Because both pans integrate raised stainless steel hexagons into the cooking surface to protect the non-stick coating, they’re not as slick as a traditional non-stick pan. As a result, delicate foods like eggs are more likely to stick if the surface isn’t greased.

Egg sticking to ungreased Henckels HXagon pan
Egg sticking to ungreased Henckels HXagon pan

I repeated the test, but instead of leaving the cooking surface dry, I greased each pan with oil and butter before adding the eggs. This time, the eggs released from the cooking surface with no issue.

Eggs cooked in Henckels HXagon vs HexClad
Eggs cooked in Henckels HXagon (left) vs. HexClad (right)

The one noticeable difference between HexClad and Henckels is that the Henckels pan heated much faster than the HexClad pan. Although both burners were set at the same heat level and I cooked the eggs for the same amount of time, the egg in the Henckels pan cooked faster and got crispier.

I also cooked pancakes in both pans. Again, the Henckels HXagon pan heated faster than the HexClad pan.

Pancakes cooking in Henckels HXagon and HexClad pans
Pancakes cooking in Henckels HXagon (left) and HexClad pans (right)

Both pans heated evenly, and the pancakes released from the surface without sticking. But when I flipped the pancakes, you could clearly see that the one in the Henckels pan cooked faster with more browning.

Pancakes cooked in Henckels HXagon and HexClad pans
Pancakes cooked in Henckels HXagon (left) and HexClad pans (right)

For my next test, I cooked chicken thighs in both pans to see which browned the meat better. After preheating both pans on medium, I greased the surfaces with oil and added the chicken.

After a few minutes, I flipped the chicken and was not surprised that the piece cooking in the Henckels pan was significantly browner. However, the piece in the HexClad pan also had good color and was cooking more evenly.

Chicken thighs cooked in Henckels HXagon and HexClad pans
Chicken thighs cooked in Henckels HXagon (left) and HexClad pans (right)

After a couple more minutes, I flipped the chicken again. On this side, the browning was much more similar between both pieces — both were seared evenly. 

Chicken thighs cooked in Henckels HXagon and HexClad pans after second flip
Chicken thighs cooked in Henckels HXagon (left) and HexClad pans (right) after second flip

I brushed the chicken with barbeque sauce and finished it in the oven. Despite the Henckels pan heating faster initially, both pans browned the meat evenly, and there was no noticeable difference in the end result.

BBQ chicken cooked in Henckels HXagon and HexClad pans
BBQ chicken cooked in Henckels HXagon (left) and HexClad pans (right)

To further test the searing ability of HexClad and Henckels HXagon, I also cooked a hamburger in both pans. I preheated the pans, added the burgers, and let them cook for a few minutes. When I flipped both burgers, the sear on the first side was almost the same. Both pans did a great job forming a crust on the burgers.

Hamburgers seared in Henckels HXagon and HexClad pans
Hamburgers seared in Henckels HXagon (left) and HexClad pans (right)

However, I noticed a difference after flipping the burgers a second time. The burger in the HexClad pan had a nicely seared crust, while the one in the Henckels pan had a lighter sear.

Hamburgers cooked in Henckels HXagon and HexClad pans after second flip
Hamburgers cooked in Henckels HXagon (left) and HexClad pans (right) after second flip

This suggests that when I flipped the burger in the Henckels pan, either the pan lost heat when the cooler meat made contact with it or the burger was not making full contact with the cooking surface to form an equivalent crust.

Heat Conduction Test

Based on these cooking tests, HexClad and Henckels HXagon pans both heat evenly, but Henckels heats faster while HexClad maintains a steadier temperature when searing cold meat.

To test these observations further, I conducted two simple experiments.

First, I poured exactly two cups of cold (55°F) water in each pan. Using the same electric burner, I heated each pan on the highest setting.

The water in the Henckels pan started boiling at the two-minute and 19-second mark. And, as expected, the HexClad pan heated slightly slower — the water started boiling at the two-minute and 30-second mark.

Water boiling in Henckels HXagon pan
Water boiling in Henckels HXagon pan

I conduct this test with every pan I review, and as the results show, both the Henckels and HexClad pans conduct heat efficiently, performing above the industry average. Only three other brands I’ve tested boiled the water faster than Henckels.

PanTime to First BubblesTime to Boil
Farberware1 minute and 2 seconds1 minute and 29 seconds
All-Clad G5 fry pan1 minute and 17 seconds2 minutes and 4 seconds
All-Clad Copper Core fry pan1 minute and 21 seconds2 minutes and 18 seconds
Henckels HXagon fry pan1 minute and 36 seconds2 minutes and 19 seconds
Made In stainless steel fry pan1 minute and 40 seconds2 minutes and 21 seconds
Anolon X pan1 minute and 35 seconds2 minutes and 22 seconds
Misen fry pan1 minute and 50 seconds2 minutes and 25 seconds
Caraway1 minute and 53 seconds2 minutes and 26 seconds
Anolon Advanced fry pan1 minute and 55 seconds2 minutes and 27 seconds
HexClad fry pan1 minute and 40 seconds2 minutes and 30 seconds
Made In non-stick fry pan1 minute and 53 seconds2 minutes and 31 seconds
Zwilling fry pan1 minute and 45 seconds2 minutes and 31 seconds
T-fal fry pan1 minute and 50 seconds2 minutes and 32 seconds
Gotham Steel fry pan1 minute and 58 seconds2 minutes and 32 seconds
Rachael Ray fry pan1 minute and 47 seconds2 minutes and 36 seconds
Viking fry pan1 minute and 42 seconds2 minutes and 39 seconds
Calphalon fry pan1 minute and 45 seconds2 minutes and 40 seconds
Sardel fry pan1 minute and 41 seconds2 minutes and 46 seconds
Pioneer Woman fry pan2 minutes and 2 seconds2 minutes and 46 seconds
Hestan fry pan1 minute and 52 seconds2 minutes and 47 seconds
GreenLife pan2 minutes and 11 seconds2 minutes and 47 seconds
Our Place Always Pan2 minutes and 2 seconds2 minutes and 48 seconds
Ninja NeverStick Pan2 minutes and 7 seconds2 minutes and 49 seconds
Tramontina fry pan1 minute and 53 seconds2 minutes and 52 seconds
Circulon fry pan2 minutes and 7 seconds2 minutes and 55 seconds
All-Clad D3 fry pan1 minute and 55 seconds2 minutes and 55 seconds
All-Clad HA1 fry pan2 minutes and 12 seconds2 minutes and 58 seconds
All-Clad D5 fry pan1 minutes and 58 seconds3 minutes and 4 seconds
Goldilocks fry pan2 minutes and 17 seconds3 minutes and 5 seconds
Demeyere Industry fry pan2 minutes and 3 seconds3 minutes and 10 seconds
Ballarini fry pan2 minutes and 15 seconds3 minutes and 12 seconds
Heritage Steel fry pan1 minute and 59 seconds3 minutes and 15 seconds
Demeyere Atlantis fry pan2 minutes and 11 seconds3 minutes and 25 seconds
Xtrema fry pan3 minutes and 41 seconds6 minutes and 7 seconds

Heat Retention Test

My second test measured the heat retention of HexClad and Henckels HXagon pans.

While fast and even heat distribution is important in cookware, heat retention is also a key factor. Pans with good heat retention maintain a steady temperature when you add cold ingredients like steak, burgers, or chicken.

Without good heat retention, the pan’s temperature can drop significantly when cold food makes contact. This temperature fluctuation prevents proper searing and can lead to uneven cooking or burning.

After the water started boiling in both pans, I took them off the heat and set them aside to cool.

After five minutes, the water in the Henckels pan was 113°F.

Henckels HXagon heat retention after 5 minutes
Henckels HXagon heat retention after 5 minutes

The water in the HexClad pan was 120°F.

HexClad heat retention after 5 minutes
HexClad heat retention after 5 minutes

After ten minutes, the water in the Henckels pan was 96°F.

Henckels HXagon heat retention after 10 minutes
Henckels HXagon heat retention after 10 minutes

The water in the HexClad pan was 102°F.

HexClad heat retention after 10 minutes
HexClad heat retention after 10 minutes

I wasn’t surprised by these results for two reasons. For one, it’s what I observed during my earlier hamburger cooking test. When I flipped the cold burger patties in the pans, the HexClad maintained its sear better than the Henckels.

And secondly, HexClad pans are 3 mm thick and Henckels pans are 2.4 mm thicker. Unless the materials differ significantly, which they do not in this case, thicker pans tend to heat slower but retain heat longer.

Thickness of HexClad pan walls 3 mm
Thickness of HexClad pan walls 3 mm
Measuring thickness of Henckels HXagon pan
Measuring thickness of Henckels HXagon pan

Here’s how HexClad and Henckels HXagon stack up against other popular cookware brands in terms of heat retention:

PanTemperature After 5 MinutesTemperature After 10 Minutes
Xtrema fry pan142°F113°F
Made In stainless steel fry pan121.1°F106.6°F
Demeyere Atlantis fry pan122.0°F106.3°F
Made In non-stick fry pan120.2°F105.8°F
Ninja NeverStick Pan130.5°F104.8°F
Misen fry pan118.6°F103.4°F
Zwilling fry pan121.1°F103.0°F
Rachael Ray fry pan126.3°F102.7°F
Goldilocks fry pan122.0°F102.5°F
HexClad fry pan120.7°F102.4°F
Circulon fry pan133.3°F102.0°F
Tramontina fry pan118.5°F101.3°F
Calphalon fry pan112.8°F101.1°F
All-Clad D3 skillet111.6°F100.9°F
Ballarini fry pan120°F99.9°F
Heritage Steel120.1°F98.2°F
All-Clad HA1 fry pan117.9°F98.1°F
Hestan fry pan114.4°F98.0°F
Sardel fry pan114.0°F97.8°F
All-Clad D5 fry pan112.7°F97.3°F
Henckels HXagon fry pan113.5°F96.7°F
Our Place Always Pan118.0°F96.7°F
Demeyere Industry fry pan115.2°F96.6°F
All-Clad G5 fry pan115.3°F96.6°F
Caraway fry pan116.6°F96.4°F
Anolon X pan114.1°F96.0°F
Viking fry pan106.6°F95.9°F
All-Clad Copper Core fry pan117.7°F95.5°F
Farberware fry pan112.0°F95.4°F
GreenLife fry pan119.0°F95.0°F
Gotham Steel fry pan113.0°F95.0°F
Anolon Advanced fry pan112.7°F90.9°F
Pioneer Woman fry pan104.3°F90.9°F
T-fal fry pan108.7°F88.0°F

Induction Cooktop Test

I conducted one more test to see which pan heats faster on induction. Induction cooktops are different from electric and gas cooktops. Instead of hot coils or flames heating the pan, which heats the food, induction cooktops use magnetic fields to generate electric currents directly in the pan, making the pan itself the heat source.

For this test, I poured two cups of cold (55°F) water into both brand’s 8-inch frying pans. I used that size because they fit nicely on my induction burner.

Then, I turned both burners on at the same time to 248°F, the highest temperature possible when using them together.

Water in the HexClad pan started to bubble first, around the two-minute and 10-second mark. Around the 5-minute and 30-second mark, the water in the HexClad pan came to a full boil while the Henckels pan was still simmering.

Testing Henckels HXagon versus HexClad on an induction cooktop
Testing Henckels HXagon versus HexClad on an induction cooktop

The overall takeaway from these tests is that HexClad and Henckels HXagon do a great job cooking delicate foods like eggs and pancakes as long as you grease the cooking surface. And they both heat evenly and sear meat well.

The key difference is that because Henckels pans are thinner, they heat faster and cool down faster. You need to pay closer attention when cooking because you can quickly burn or overcook food if the heat is too high.

HexClad pans heat slower on gas and electric cooktops but are easier to control since they maintain a steadier temperature.

Besides cooking performance, there are a few other differences to consider.

Handle Design

Both have rounded handles that fork at the end to disperse heat, but Henckels handles are angled higher, while HexClad handles are more even with the rim of the pan. The end of the Henckels handle is 3.5 inches above the counter, while HexClad’s is only 2.5 inches.

HexClad and Henckels HXagon handles
HexClad (front) and Henckels HXagon (back) handles

Henckels handles are also longer at 8.5 inches versus HexClad’s 8 inches.

HexClad vs Henckels HXagon handles
HexClad (top) vs. Henckels HXagon (bottom)

Additionally, Henckels engraves its logo on the handle along with a slight indentation for your thumb. HexClad handles are smooth with no engravings or grooves.

Henckels HXagon handle
Henckels HXagon handle

The better handle design is subjective, but I like Henckels because it’s longer, and the higher angle keeps your hand further from the heat. However, the angle of HexClad’s handle allows you to fit the pan between oven racks with less space.

Cooking Surface

Both pans have raised stainless steel peaks and non-stick valleys on the cooking surface. But Henckels pans have a higher ratio of steel to non-stick coating.

Henckels HXagon versus HexClad cooking surfaces
Henckels HXagon (left) versus HexClad (right) cooking surfaces

With more exposed steel, I thought Henckels pans would be more sticky when cooking eggs, but I didn’t notice a difference during my tests.

Also, HexClad rivets are flatter. Since Henckels rivets stick out more, they are more likely to trap oil and food and are slightly more difficult to clean.

Henckels HXagon and HexClad rivets
Henckels HXagon (left) and HexClad (right) rivets

Bottom

The bottom of these pans is also different. With HexClad, the non-stick and stainless steel hexagon patterned surface is not only on the interior but on the bottom, too. Henckels pans only have the hybrid pattern on the cooking surface; the bottoms are polished steel.

Bottom of Henckels HXagon and HexClad pans
Bottom of Henckels HXagon and HexClad pans

The non-stick coating on the bottom of HexClad pans makes them easier to clean. With Henckels, the bottom is more prone to staining and discoloration. You’ll need to occasionally use Bar Keepers Friend to restore the shine.

Although I have not experienced this problem, a PrudentReivews.com reader reached out and told me the bottom of her HexClad pan left noticeable scratches on her glass cooktop. There were no visible burrs on the bottom of the pan, so she believes the raised hexagon pattern caused the scratches.

I searched through thousands of HexClad reviews on various retail sites and only found a few similar complaints, so it doesn’t appear to be a common issue. But it’s a potential risk to consider if you have a glass cooktop.

Price

Price is one of the most significant differences between HexClad and Henckels HXagon cookware.

HexClad pans are significantly more expensive. For example, the 12-inch HexClad frying pan is listed on HexClad.com for more than double the price of the Henckels HXagon 3-piece set, which includes 8-, 10-, and 12-inch frying pans.

Bottom Line: Should You Buy HexClad or Henckels HXagon Pans?

So, is HexClad worth the higher price? Or should you go with less expensive Henckels pans?

Based on my testing, the differences between these two brands are not significant enough to justify paying more than twice as much for HexClad.

Both heat evenly, release food without sticking, and sear meat well. Although HexClad pans retain heat better and heat faster on induction cooktops, the differences are minor. Plus, Henckels handles are longer, and the bottom is smooth, so you don’t have to worry about scratching your cooktop.

That said, HexClad does have some advantages. Most notably, it’s been in the market for years and has become one of the most popular cookware brands.

Part of its success is due to great marketing, but the product has also been thoroughly tested and has proven to perform well.

Although some people dislike HexClad and call it a gimmick, thousands of happy customers say otherwise. I’ve used HexClad for years, and although it has flaws, it’s one of the more versatile pans I’ve tested.

Henckels has been around a long time, but the HXagon collection is brand new. Because of its HexClad-like hybrid design, I assume it will last longer than traditional non-stick cookware, but only time will tell. The construction is significantly thinner than HexClad, so it may be more prone to warping.

Compare the current prices and read more reviews on HexClad.com and Costco.com (Henckels).

Andrew Palermo Founder of Prudent Reviews

Andrew Palermo - About the Author

Andrew is the Founder and Editor-in-Chief of Prudent Reviews. He began his career in marketing, managing campaigns for dozens of Fortune 500 brands. In 2018, Andrew founded Prudent Reviews and has since reviewed 600+ products. When he’s not testing the latest cookware, kitchen knives, and appliances, he’s spending time with his family, cooking, and doing house projects. Connect with Andrew via emailLinkedIn, or the Prudent Reviews YouTube channel.

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